Friday, May 27

5 Tips to Get More Attention on Jango


We've recently done a few feature reminders and a couple blog posts on topics such as what works best for emails and 'outside the box' promotions strategies. Today we thought it would be good to break down in 5 simple tips how to get more attention, in the form of eyes and ears, on Jango.com with your Airplay campaign...so here we go.

1. Master your songs first - We can not stress enough the importance of mastering when it comes to radio airplay, especially when you're being played on Jango alongside all the biggest names in your genre. If your song comes on and it's not mastered it might only be at half to two thirds of the volume of the artist that played before. This will get you some attention, but not in the way you want, so make sure everything is mastered and sounds it's best.

2. Play your best song or songs the most - Just like on terrestrial radio listeners want to hear the hits, so find out what your hits are and play those songs the most. People will want to discover your other music then. You can easily run a test by keeping your targeting the same but only playing one song at a time. Then after a few days add up the likes and fans that each song got and pick the best ones.

3. Have an engaging profile pic or cover art - The first thing people see when they hear your song on Jango is the picture that's in the player so make sure it's something exciting. Figure out what your most valuable visual asset is and use that to your advantage.

4. Play with your custom message in the artist overlay - Change this message often. You can think of it like a Facebook status update. Say something funny, announce a show, share some music; The idea is to get people to click it so think about what would make you click?

5. Record an audio intro and add it to the beginning of your song - This is a really fun one because on internet radio it never happens and will definitely perk up some ears. Record a short message from you or your band, 5 to 8 seconds at most, that says something as simple as 'hey, this is our band and you're listening to us on Jango.com'. Have fun with it.

16 comments:

youchillmusic said...

The mastering tip is important. If you are putting pre-release/pre-mastered tunes on Jango at least get the average volume level in line with current releases by using a limiter like Waves L series or Voxengo Elephant.

chris williams said...

Izotope ozone is great aswell and very affordable.

youchillmusic said...

Yes, I've heard lots of good stuff about ozone

Robert Sherwood said...

But hey- consider actually releasing your cds with tracks that aren't rendered horrible, flat and without dynamics because they've been raped with brickwall limiting. Younger people might not notice it as much because they're used to mp3's that wreck your cilia, but there are a lot of older people listening who don't know why music sounds so wretched now. Look at your wav files. If they look like a brick (or a "turdbrick" as I call them, you might win the Loudness Wars but you've lost the "music that doesn't hurt to listen to" battle.

Buck Baran said...

If you have any control over the mastering consult the book "Mastering Audio - the art and the science" 2nd edition by Bob Katz.
I use ProTools LE 8.whatever w/ HP Probook 4510.
EQ roll-off at both ends w/ -3db dip at 3K.
Maxim comp. w/ subtle pumping and PowR Type3 dither. Dynamics are still present.
WAV to MP3. I get good level. MP3 faithful to WAV. Give a listen. HAVE FUN AND SEE TO IT OTHERS DO.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, Robert has a good point!

Brian Hazard said...

Speaking as both a mastering engineer and a reader of Bob's book, I don't recommend Buck's method - especially the cut at 3 KHz. I never roll off the highs, and don't roll off the lows unless it's absolutely necessary. Not to say that the formula wouldn't work on a very specific mix, but really, there is no formula.

Buck Baran said...

Hey Brian,
Thanks for the input. Now that I have refined my monitoring system, on my next release I'll try leaving the ends alone. Or at least the highs. Maybe I misunderstood the 3k range being we are supposed to be sensitive to it. I use a not-to-wide Q.
Buck

Anonymous said...

Engaging pictures always wins over the opposite sex!! & these days..sometimes the same sex...
Hey!!! a Fan is a Fan... I see GREEN$$

Trav Is Everything
www.youtube.com/TravisEverything
www.facebook.com/everythinguaint
www.twitter.com/iIsEverything

frankcraven said...

I hope the song sells itself versus me having to nurse it along. I have faith/tengo fe...

Brioni Altieri said...

I like this page is helping me to grow my music every ware.

Craig"Iceman" Proffer said...

Hey guys. Wanted to comment on the 3k range. I am the artist, mixing and mastering engineer of my music. I use all the top tools or. Ozone4, Waves, T-Racks, and learned from trial and error how to work the timber of the mix. The 3G range is like my "dog whistle". I am super sensitive to that range so I used to really cut it during mastering. We have to realize this is where alot of parts come together harmonically like vocals and guitar , but this is also where our loudness lies. If you control the sub bass and boost the mid highs you will see that RMS meter really go up. That is the true loudness. Just remember working the timbre of the eq is a balancing act. Be careful cutting the 3k range. If it's to intense in the mastering phase, you might want to go back to the mix and take a little bit out of them guitars. Vocals should be loud and right down the middle. No vocals, No Song ... Www. Cosmic-Deathride-records.com

Anonymous said...

Don't mix or master in your headphones.

Anonymous said...

No, don't mix or master in your phones, because they will be bass heavy or mid heavy, plus they are too close to your ears and we master for awesome speakers several feet away, not for phones, which can't be awesome in most cases.

But they are pretty good for judging your level balance of instruments as a second opinion when sitting in front of your speakers has numbed your brain.

Rene Patrique said...

I love the idea of the last point - Cheers from Germany !!

Anonymous said...

Is anyone making substantial money from song downloads or online radio station streaming, from people originally introduced to your work by Jango? The object here is for creators to get paid for the use of our work, not to keep paying to promote it, indefinitely. World-class studio mastering, high Jango PopScores, slews of free listeners, and a Jango Fan list with numerous positive comments do not seem to generate substantial financial income on iTunes, Amazon.com, CDbaby.com, etc.; there's no correlation between free play popularity, and download purchase here. The Jango promotion cost always exceeds the income from sales, as far as I can tell. Can anyone tell us you've made money because of Jango?