Tuesday, November 10

Free Stuff !!! - Tell Us How You Engage Social Media & Online Services?


FREE stuff!
Have I got your attention? Great, because this week, we're offering you a chance to win 1000 free spins on Jango Airplay. Here's the skinny -

We want to hear how you engage social media to develop your career, and we want your Airplay contemporaries to benefit from that knowledge. So this week we're sponsoring a contest on the Airplay Blog. The user with the best answer to the following question wins 1000 free plays and the opportunity to expand their thoughts as a guest blogger...

What we want to know is...What's the best piece of advice you can give emerging bands such as yourself when it comes to using online services (Jango to Facebook, Tunecore to Twitter) in the digital age?

Responses should be 250 words or less, and shared in the comment section of this post. The winner will be announced in next week's newsletter and right here.

148 comments:

Who Is That?! said...

Don't spread yourself too thin by signing up with too many social sites. Make a plan and stay focused on the plan and revise the plan if you aren't getting the results you want. Learn from others and adjust something that worked for them and tailor it for you, your market and target audience. There's no need to reinvent the wheel, but makeing modifications is always a good thing.

B-Shad said...

This is B-Shad "Talk Of The Streets" and all i can say is be yourself. Never try to be like anybody else, because they swag can faid away but yours might never. Do your own thing and do what your fans want to hear, because in the long run the are the nes there for you.

Ryan Jurgen said...

Obviously being authentic is the main goal. You want to make sure everything is a good representation of you. Make it personal so people can get to know you, without actually knowing who you are. Make it stand out with various colours, pictures, and videos. Its very important that you just be youself and people will embrace you as an artist.

Rico Rachet said...

Twitter is right now the best form of communication to stay in contact with fans because it is constant and to the minute up to date my advice twitter like there is no tomorrow because the more connected your fans feel the more they will support!

Joel Merriman said...

Expose yourself! Social media is born out of the desire to expose yourself to innumerable new people. Take advantage of every opportunity you can. Ever media outlet that will let you play for the masses should be grasped and handled immediately. Any outlet that your customers can reach you by increases your chances of being found and exposed like mad. The internet is your friend.

Chrissy Loran said...

Never participate in anything until you know all the details. People like to rip you off, and you can never be too careful in any circumstance. Try to talk to others who have already used the website or promotion.
Don't do anything that would allow people to steal your music, i.e. give out lyrics, chords or downloads.
Be professional. People get irritated trying to read "online lingo" when they're trying to find out about an artist. You won't get anywhere that way.
Also, use all the resources you can. Don't just stick to one site in promoting your music, but don't use so many that you can't keep up with them.
I think that's about it!

Power Sol said...

It gives you a chance to not only get spins with some of the contemporary artists of the day (Jay-Z,Nas,Beyonce) but it also gives you information to target areas that are feeling your music. If you are poppin in Florida, focus on marketing your material in Florida. Jango and other social media outlets also makes it easy for your fans to give feedback to your music and also be able to track your progress as you navigate your way through this puzzle we call the industry.

Anonymous said...

MOST ONLINE MUSIC SERVICES ARE DISHONEST THERE ARE TOO MANY THIEVES OFFERING MUSIC SERVICES ON THE INTERNET ALMIGHTY GREAT GOD KNOW THIS IS THE HONEST TRUTH


www.jango.com/music/Buffalo+Soldier


THE GREAT
BUFFALO SOLDIER

Chris Diana said...

Make yourself look as professional as possible. There are thousands of bands out there. How are you going to be different? One important step is to make sure people can take you seriously.

Natalie Brown said...

Make sure you know who your audience is! Chances are, they are people just like you with similar interests. Don't just 'point and shoot' blindly when you enter the social realm. Use search functions to seek out people using keywords for things that interest you and find people who share similar passions, interests etc. When you find people, introduce yourself to them first, then later in conversation mention your music. Engaging in social dialogue with like minds is the key to using social media to promote your music!
Good luck! Natalie Brown http://www.natalie-brown.com

Axium said...

Well, I've been working in Sales & Marketing for 10 years. I've led a lot of very succesful campaigns outside of the music industry.

Presence is key, as well as brand identity. We make a constant effort to be (seemingly) everywhere our target audience is. Better defination of that target audience is important (Jango has great reports) to focus efforts effectively.

Watch what the big guys do and try to do the same. A budget helps in major ways.

My biggest tip for internet marketing: It's all about links and relevancy. Google and partners crawl the web to find the most relevant sites when someone does a search. Relevancy is effected by how many sites link in to yours and how often the content reflects the search term. LINK LINK LINK. Microsites (dozens of fakey sites) are a great tool...

I personally use (EVERYDAY) ReverbNation, Jango, MySpace (critical), Facebook, Twitter, iLike, MusicForte and Pandora as well as our own site. We make a point to ad fans everyday, and play our music to new people everyday.

Troy Dean said...

Discipline yourself to spending a certain amount of time each day or each week and have a clear strategy in place. I released a new song every two weeks on my Facebook Fan page and linked back to my Jango profile page. Within a few weeks I had received enough thumbs up to get added to regular rotation on Jango. Spend some time getting to know each social media site and what they are good for. LinkedIn is great for newtorking with executives and professionals in the industry, Twitter is great for stying in touch with fans, Facebook is great for sharing photos and stories and MySpace is cool for streaming your music. Ping.fm allows you to update all your social sites at once and TweetDeck is cool for a snapshot of your social media world. And don't get bogged down or sidetracked - keep making great music.

Heather said...

Social media has become a crucial part of my networking as an artist. It is a way to connect with people and get my music heard in real time across the globe. The networking sites also offer a veritable plethora of knowledge, tips, tricks and advice from not only artists, but others in the music business and sometimes even the fans themselves. The constantly changing world wide web definitely keeps me on my toes. From posting updates and learning the latest technology to adding the latest apps and linking the services together - it can feel like a full-time job in and of itself! The best piece of advice that I can offer about social media is to make yourself available on as many sites as possible, be consistent in your profile (branding), be professional and be grateful! Not enough people say thank you these days - it's not just common courtesy, it shows you are taking the time to acknowledge your fans/colleagues and paying attention.

Vessy Mink said...

When it comes to using online services regarding your music, the best advice I can give is to keep your profiles up to date! Stay in touch with your fans and only upload your highest quality sound recordings. Don't get stuck on being a rockstar...techincally we are all "rock star" and you should keep focused on your music and your evolvement as an up and coming artist. Don't be afraid to give your music away. People want to hear it and not everyone is able to purchase music online. The more your music gets out into the world, the better. Be positive and don't hold on to ancient views about the music industry...it is rebuilding itself every shuffle, just like a deck of cards. Cool thing is... you are the dealer:) And good luck!

Anonymous said...

The best thing in getting your music out there to help you that I have found is never give up on your sucess and always remenber there is always some that will not like what you do ,But there is alot more that does like your music!And Always enjoy what you are doing for yourself and don't give up on your airplay or your websites.
Just keep on picking and singing.
Dennis with(Misty Mountain Bluegrass)

Some Guy said...

The best piece of advice for bands such as myself (unsigned indie) is to put the digital age in it's rightful place. Right behind human to human contact. Nobody's going to get rich and famous because they had a cool facebook profile with 8 million friends. Record good music that people actually want to buy, play live shows that people actually want to attend and then when they become your social network friend it will actually mean something.

Mike said...

The best piece of advice I can give is ALWAYS remember this music industry is not an instant gratification business. Make realistic goals and work like mad to refine and achieve them. Set up your goals for short, medium and long range. Jango is a teriffic median to turn the world onto your work and get statistics on what is working for your material. Nothing is more gratifying then to get a new fan from 10,000 miles away saying they love your work. That is as good as a paycheck...well almost. Stay upbeat at all times. Good luck! Mike G. Murphy aka wendolarules

Emile Monney said...

I would opt for a centralized information center linked to several devices. Let me explain :
You can create a website or a blog with all the information about you and your music. This is the centralized information.
Then you can use several medias to get people to your centralized information. This can be by using Facebook, YouTube, mySpace or other social network. You can create a T-shirt with the address of your blog or site, stickers that you can give or stick in several places.
Most of all, be proud of yourself and your music. By being proud you’ll get the nerve to do this sometimes hard job which is to go for hte customer, go for the fan. Be proud, get people to you site and let them know about you. Take them by the hand and let them discover you. They’ll let their friends discover you the same.

Tommy C said...

There are thousands of marketing portals to use in order to get your music out there. My advice is use them all. My second piece of advice is plan ahead and you will save hours of time. Before you start listing your band and or music on all the portals. Spend an hour in Micro Soft office and write all your information out like a resume. Put everything together about the band members, press, music and bio in one big file. Then as you go to a site and sign up have your resume open. Do some copy and paste to the new site from your file. Keep a note book with the site address and your password and a time period when to check back on it for updates. Just because every site ask the same questions doesn't mean it's ok to just list on a couple. List on them all and take advantage of each of their marketing outlets.
Tommy C
www.buck69.net

Anonymous said...

I use every online site that I can find thats free and or affordable to get my music heard and use links on all sites to route people to the site and always have a home base site or get emails when that site has a hit so that you know people are visiting that site so that you don't have to check every one all the time you can just check your main site. My best regards and good luck with your music. also use good sites like jango were you know people are going to hear your songs
thanks! Jeremy kyle look me up at jango.com or myspace.com/1songwriters

YoungTone100 said...

I Would Tell Them To Definetly Put A page on every site available and keep track of how there doin and make sure to post your music on Jango.com It Really Gets Your Music out There

Anonymous said...

this is annis of the kakaheads,,,,my advice is,,,don't quit your day job....

Nismah Osman said...

Tthrough the years that I have been learning to utilize the social internet services, I have noticed that my existence in the music industry has become more pertinent. Before the digital age, the use of CD's and even going back to Vinyl made it diffiuclt for an unsigned or unendorsed artist to get themselves out there. However, now that we can utilize sites of today such as MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, PureVolume, Jango, personal band websites, promotion sites and the like, we can as artists, almost freely and easily spread the word about our bands, music and shows. It is very important that we learn to use these sites to the best of our ability, and to the fullest possible extent. Having internet presence not only allows for great networking, but also makes your image more professional, increasing your chances for a major industry exec. to spot you out and attain interest. So, I encourage you all to utilize these sites, and many others not imcluded above, it will really make a difference.

Cory York said...

Remember that to really connect with your fans you have to be more than a name and a song, you have to be a person. Fans are the foundation of a successful career, whether they are an old friend or a stranger in another country. Make yourself available to your listeners, post comments, blogs and bulletins, show appreciation for their support. You'll be building more than a fan club, you'll be creating a following.

Best of luck,
Cory York
http://www.jango.com/music/Cory+York

Andrew P said...

#1 make good music!! go hard, stay focused, be positive, join every music site you can to promote, upload new material, update you status's, network with with your fans, link all your sites or apps together, dont give up till your dead!! get distribution brand your work... share it with the world.. you are the boss!!

Gig Pigs said...

The best thing an indie band can do with online services is to think of these services as "advertising". What would print media or TV spots cost you and how well would they perform. There's nothing better and less expensive than using your advertising budget to get your music out to as many listeners as you can through jango, myspace and others.
Make sure your website is as much of a store as it is entertaining. That way, as more people hear your tunes, the next time they spend $20 or so downloading music, they might just remember you.
Going on the road and trying to sell CD's is the tough road now days.
If your music is good, you will do just as well or better online when you think of the effort and cost as avertising.

anyonetime said...

There are only two kinds of music out here. New and innovative music that leads the way into the future. Commercial music that once lead, but now stagnates. If you are in for just the money, or the thrill, you have to pick your audience
accordingly.

Bain Anderson said...

If you aren't independent you are DEPENDENT!!! Remember to ALWAYS put your best foot forward. The online fans and media DO NOT really want to hear your demos. Strive for a finished product but don't be fooled into thinking that is the key to it all. The biggest obstacle an emerging artist has is EXPOSURE and PROMOTION. People need to know WHO YOU ARE!!! Jango, Myspace, Facebook and yes even Twitter are an artists best friend!

Sean said...

Using social networks and the internet to your advantage depends a lot on your target audience. Determine the age group of your listenners, other bands they like, and what image they associate with (by the way, jango offers great ways to see this type of information about your plays)... Once you determine the crowd, create and maintain an "image" on your social networks and website. You should avoid using your Band's Website/Social Network/Other to do personal updates, keep your information short and to the point. Consistently releasing fresh material to consume (updates on tour schedules, updates on release dates, updates on where you can get stuff related to your band, or anything else deemed band related) you will build and keep a strong online fan-base. The key to keeping your tribe is to regularly engage them with fresh material.
If you are an artist trying to get attention, by record labels, actively enter and compete in music competitions (both live performers and producers, there are many-many-many contests online). For the unsigned artist, exposure is key, by entering your work into competitions you greatly improve your chances to be heard by someone in the industry, or with connections to the industry... Remember, you don't have to win to get noticed, however first impressions are very important, so make sure you select your best work to submit!
Wish you the best of luck!
FireSickle - firesickle.com - Hear FireSickle on JANGO.COM!

BluBlack said...

I think the best way to get your brand out there is to get on as many different music sites as possible.Using different songs on each site(you can use some of the same songs),cause each site has a whole different fanbase.Jango is the mother site,cause if you put your hotest song up,that you would use for singles,wait a few months (like 4) , then go on Reports, and it will show you in the U.S.A or Over seas which song your fans like the most, and thats the song you use for your video.

JP said...

I'd say the most important thing to keep in mind is to keep your various promotional systems integrated. Sure, you want a myspace, a facebook, a twitter, a website. You want distribution, and internet radio services like Jango. But more important than having these individual services is making sure that they are working together to make the best of your marketing strategy. Everything should link to everything else. All your videos that you post on your site should be embedded into your myspace page, and all your myspace friends should be able to find your website. Your twitter ought to be linked to your facebook account, and your blog needs to be up to date on everything. This way, you exponentially increase the effectiveness of whatever systems you do choose to utilize, be it myspace, facebook, or imeem.

Scotte Burns said...

Simple...Read the Terms you are agreeing to before uploading your creative works. That includes music, cover art and lyrics. Know what rights you are granting and retaining before you just click "accept" and send your heart and soul's work into someone else's clutches. At the risk of being crude, you better understand the business end so you don't take it in the business end.

CUTS Music said...

Define your music. By doing so, you define your target audience. You need not be a presence to everyone online.

A MySpace site isn't a professional site; it's an addendum to a proper "official" site. Twitter, Facebook, etc. are "social" sites that serve as a means to disclose your "personality" to friends and, don't forget, potential fans. What you write, photos posted by friends, and even the games you play may appeal to - and simultaneously repel - potential fans. That said, social sites are not music business sites - they are "bonus" material for fans IF maintained properly. Learn about your fans or your potential audience. Engage them, get one-to-one interaction via comments, guestbooks and blogs.

However, if you spend more time on Facebook than playing music, it's time to re-evaluate your goals.

Ian Borges said...

Be HONEST and be YOURSELF.

Social networks are a great place to meet people and attract fans that are actually interested in *you* as an artist and *you* as a person. You can forge some of the best friendships and alliances by being truthful with the people you meet, and engaging with those that took the time to reach out to you.

Without a doubt, being genuine in your dealings with the public will only enhance your image and help you develop a fan-base that *wants* to see you succeed.

Ciao for now!

Nadine the Band said...

Who doesn't have a personal myspace or facebook page? Do you get bombarded with bands requesting your friendship and asking you to "check out our trax and tell us what you think"? I believe this is the pitfall of many bands. People don't want to work for you by listening to your music, critiquing it, or even clicking "accept"... that is, unless you give them a reason to. Sad as it is, bands must do all the work. We must market ourselves in a way that is not threatening, pretentious, or overwhelming. Be real with your potential fans. Offer them something new. Don't overwhelm them with constant trivial updates and bulletins. Bands need to utilize these music and social networking sites to entertain fans, not annoy them. Advertise your shows, CDs, songs, and videos intelligently. Figure out your online audience and cater to them while still being yourself. If bands can all appropriately use these sites, then maybe fans will give us more respect and be more interested in our music.

Eski said...

You can try and add as many friends on those sites as you want, but if you don't have quality songs, or are looking for the wrong type of fans, it won't matter how many plays or friends you have, because all you'll get is that 1 listen, and they will never listen again.

Emily Bourbon of AM Theory Project said...

As an indie trip hop artist, social networking sites and internet radio sites like Jango are vital to being able to spread the word and communicate with current and potential fans. My rules of thumb: be consistent, be honest and be available. If you blog, do it regularly. Don’t hype yourself up only to let your listeners down. If you're growing as an artist, let your fans grow with you. And in my experience, personal communications get you a lot farther with fans than thousands of robotic messages and updates.

Flight Crash Companion said...

Write really really good music, and have a professional, well maintained online imagine/presence. Any well-designed social network like Jango, TheSixtyOne or Facebook will do the work for you, and the fans will come to you. And when they do come, make sure you have meaningful interactions. Someone posts a three page diatribe on how much they love you? Send them a free album or t-shirt. They'll tell all their friends how great you sound AND how cool you are, and you've just picked up 20 more fans. Also, pace yourself. Don't drop a whole album at once. Release a new track every week instead of all in one shot. People have incredibly short attention spans. Keep your status updates fresh, but don't over do it, and definitely don't go dark for months on end. And don't look at giving away your music as a loss, look at it as a marketing expense. And don't spam anyone. No one wants to "Check out your new EP!" if they've never heard of you. And finally, have a killer live show. Theres a million good bands online, but very few great live bands. Be one of them.

Glyn MacLean said...

My experience has been that success with integrating media content in social networks for a commercial outcome occurs when we deliver ‘content into context’. It’s like trying to put a square peg in a square hole. We need to be focus our music (product) and brand towards a specific target audience.

Quality not Quantity.
Put your best work forward and not your doodles!

Connectivity.
Make sure that all your sites are inter-connected!

Simple not Complex.
Principles such as AIDA (attention interest desire action) apply to marketing music. Audiences need a simple, relatable attention grabbing proposition that attracts them.

Devotion to Emotion.
Consumers buy on 80% emotion. Make the messages you’re putting out appeal to emotion.

Rush into Relationship.
The most valuable commodity we can have is an audience. Social network and online marketing sites are fabulous for finding, keeping and growing an audience.We can create an instant relationship with an audience by being relatable to current affairs and having a situational awareness. IE: a twitter about worldwide news will be relatable. Funny things also work like “OMG I’m at the music awards and Usher just farted!” You’d be surprised what works! Experiment!

Now
Make it all about ‘now is the moment’ and ‘we’re in this together’. Take your audience on a journey with you. Give them a positive experience. Reward them for being on Twitter with fan only downloads and live event offers. Let them be part of your album focus group giving you feedback on new songs.

Jaloes said...

FIRST: BE THERE. Keep your music, news and info up to date among the many social media you are using. Tell something new every day. Be available to the people, and always answer their questions and feedback.

SECOND: BUILD REAL RELATIONSHIPS. When connecting with people, do not just try to sell them your music. Be a real person with real thoughts, make comments and give your opinion. Be honest and try to build long term relationships.

THIRD: INVEST YOUR TIME. Be ready to spend a lot of time every day achieving the previous goals. Focus on these goals to get the most of your efforts.

Check Out Our Videos Here! said...

People are visual. TV was so huge, because we didn't have to read and when we saw something we liked we told our friends. Today, we can instantly tell our friends and even show them as well. So, my suggestion is to make videos ... all kinds of videos! And get everyone to share them!

You don't need a big budget to make a music video these days. You can make a $10 video a lot more interesting then a $100,000 video. Just be creative and make some for a few of your songs! Our budget for "I Rather Dance With A Stranger" was $100 and our budget for "Love Redundant" was $0. Check them out at the link above!

Also, make all kinds of vidoes. Not just music vidoes. I'm taking simple stuff. Make one of the band at rehearsal and another of the band performing an acoustic version of a song in a living room. Make one of you doing something silly/funny, make an educational one, make video invites to shows, a video bio, etc ...

Just don't bombard people and make each one a least a little special.

J. Whitman said...

Let's face facts here: we, the artists, will tell you the EXACT SAME THING: DO YOUR HOMEWORK! You need to have a plan in place to execute thoroughly and swiftly. From my experience, sites like MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter are good, but sites like ReverbNation work better, since the tools are already provided for your use. All you need to do is figure out is how to use them effectively, and no single artist can determine how to do that universally. You have to make your own path, not someone else's formula.

MADI SIMMONS said...

NEVER,EVER,listen to those willsay that putting your music on websites are a waste of time...IT;S YOUR TIME,NOT THEIRS/after all, we DO want to be heard.DONT WE?

Tony Copeland said...

The best advise I can give to other emerging artist when engaging social media for career development is to be authentic and avoid funny business and hidden agendas. Know where you stand in your career before fully launching yourself into social media. Read and study, this way you will have some idea about your ROI (Return on Investment). Remember that it's not about free marketing, it's about customer service. Encourage and allow your friends and social media associates to get involved. They are a valuable asset to you. Get involved with your audience. Let them know that they are listened to. I try to write all my Jango fans just to say hi and to let them know that there would be no success for me if not for them. They answer back and a few have developed a continual relationship with me.

Sammy Smash said...

All that we aim for as an independent artist is the right exposure and sales. With Jango Airplay you can target those fans that listen to your type of music by choosing those fans that listen to artist similar to your style, thus getting the right exposure. In reference to sales you have to lead the horse to water sort of speak by linking, you can do this with all online music services and social media sites. Example I use my pic as a link to my CDBABY CD SALES PAGE, by having all of that info in my pic. You have to promote and realize the focal point of all your goals. Sell Sell Sell. Ps. Remember It doesn't hurt that Jango Airplay reports to Performing Rights Societies (ASCAP, BMI, & SESAC Etc.) either it can make you some extra money as well so that's why Jango Airplay is great, Reverbnation pays as well. Ps. as a whole think about the type of online community the site has like myspace has millions of artist you might wanna put out a cd with beats and promote it there but you wouldn't promote that same beat cd as hard on jango cause the community is diffrent. Think of all the ways you can use sites to your advantage and best of luck !!!

Art Guest said...

Playing in an indie band with little or no funding has it's disadvantages. Having free social marketing sites at your finger tips is something EVERY ARTIST should take advantage of.

You must constantly feed your fan base (albeit a small one at first) with a constant stream of content! Posting blogs, YouTube videos, viral video campaigns, free downloads, conducting street team initiatives, promoting shows and tours- can all be done FOR FREE on Facebook, Myspace, Jango, YouTube, Twitter, and MOST importantly your band's website. Get a solid branding down that represents your sound and image and streamline your sites to make it easy for your fans to recognize you- the product!

Danny Massure said...

The best piece of advice I can give when it comes to using online music services is that networking is less about attracting fans and more about connecting with your peers. In turn, your peers' fans will become your fans. How do you connect with your peers? A friend request alone is not going to do it. Give them a complement. You remember other artists that gave you a compliment. Make compliments public. You will attract new fans that saw you complimented an artist that they're into, and they'll check out your music. Don't make it all about you, make it about a community. People enjoy being part of something, such as supporters of a particular genre.

WESSIDE said...

It's simple, you use every social networking site out there if it fit into your musical plan.Myspace,twitter,facebook,tag,jango,CDBaby,Snocap,craigslist etc.

And you manifest these behavoirs daily and rapidly network network network is what it's all about.Fanbase fanbase fanbase build it and don't never stop as long as you live to do music your building your fanbase
An threw the grace of god sirrous work ethic,and good music anyone could be succesful in this new digital age. THANK YOU I APPRECIATED THIS TIME TO SAY WHATS REAL THAT'S WHAT I DO.

Jason Blakely said...

My band has joined all (relevant)social networking sites possible, allowing saturation into different markets across the world. This creates undeniable presence amongst thousands of artists, and exposes us to the most viable fans. It also reduces personal legwork, as word of mouth is the most powerful tool you can wield. (Fans who seek out music are usually the ones spreading it throughout their social circles.)
The key to success? Constant activity: my bandmates and myself all have smartphones, enabling us to respond to any given site(we're each designated certain webpages to maintain) in real time. "Tour photos/updates anyone? Catch some dinner and drinks with us before the show?"

Remember: you want to be active, but not intrusive; flooding someone's facebook/myspace updates is a good way to be deleted, and quickly.

It's also important to have a "linking" social network page like reverbnation.com, or artistdata.com, where all information from your various sites can be compiled and viewed in comprehensive numbers/stats. This allows you to DETERMINE the target audience everyone on here keeps referring to.
Once you've found your target audience, exploit that knowledge: is your band finding ground among the Reggae/Rock scene? Go to 311's myspace, and send requests to THEIR fans. TELL THEM how you found them, and why they should invest time in your music(new album/video?).
Really wanna be slick? Target requests geographically to coincide with your tour: "What!? An awesome new band, AND they're coming to my city?"

CMAJOR said...

Sign up for as many sites as possible. Choose ONE to rely on again and again. Use that one reliable site to fuel your career. Do comment on other people's projects but stay positive. No one really wants to read negative stuff about themselves. You can win friends and influence others by staying positive. Take advantage of opportunities to submit your music to any good opportunities that are out there. Climb as far as you can. Thank all of your supporters. Network, network, network...There are all kinds of goods and services out there and chances to step-up your music career. Lastly, use your gut feeling at all times.

P Bailey said...

The best advice one can give for using soicial networking sites for best results are know your target audiance,age, gender ect amd a great marketing plan!

Israel Gonzales said...

The best piece of advice I could give to emerging artists about using social sites is 1)GIVE AWAY FREE MUSIC! Offer songs in exchange for an email address. Build a fan base first! I mean C'mon,you're a unknown artist,who's gonna buy your music right off the bat? Once the people out there hear your music they're more likley to purchase your "New Music" or come to a show! **It works for me!
2)PUT YOURSELF OUT THERE!! Some people like certain sites so join all them all (just in case)BUT, only advertise your most popular ones. Plus more "Social Sites" helps for an awesome Google search of you're bands name! People will wonder why yer name is all over the web..which will spark intrest and maybe gain new fans!

Makar said...

It is a brave new world in the music business. It is important to know that using these new marketing and distribution tools to enhance what you are already doing on the performance side can give you a powerful advantage.
It is no longer necessary to court record labels only to get 7 cents per song. A lot of these famous artist that we see are really not making money on their product. Just think about the fact that selling 6,000 units on your own could mean some nice coin, while doing the same on most labels will get you dropped quickly.
It is important to grow your fan base at the grassroots level, all of these tools let you do that. What makes Jango great is the immediate response that can be obtained from the spins/plays of your music. All of the data and information obtained can help you make informed decisions about how to position yourself in the marketplace. This is big!
You can be your own mogul. The sky is the limit and the playing field has been leveled by these internet tools.
You are in the drivers seat.

Pierre Massé said...

I think that the most useful thing to keep in mind is that you just have to keep at it and keep working at building a fanbase using social networking tools. Don't overdo it, focus yourself, but keep at it and consistently work the promotion tools... and don't be afraid to spend a little on promotion if you can, it really helps!

J Fuk said...

It's always a good idea to get your name out there as much as you can. Just remember where you put your information and make sure you constantly follow up. You never know where or when you are gonna get a new fan, and it might just be a matter of a quick personal response to get one. Be smart, be professional, and be honest! There are a lot of ways to promote yourself for free with a little work!

Catman Cohen said...

As a musician utilizing an exceptionally unorthodox approach to presenting The Catman Project, I find the online sites to be invaluable.

Catman Cohen is largely a creation of online digital media and, without them, I would not exist at all.

In selecting my family of friends, I define my shadowy identity distinctively, even in the absence of a standard bio photo, since the friends who surround me reveal clearly who I really am; most importantly, their messages and input shape me into what I must become.

In presenting my music, the feedback from the online sites allows me to determine my strengths and weaknesses, and that enables me to develop sharper strategies for improved future endeavors.

Most importantly, I believe the online sites allow me to bypass the monolithic gate-keepers of the musical Establishment who normally would prevent the presentation of material outside the commercial mainstream.

It all adds up to this one piece of advice:

whether you use online sites once a day, week, month, or year, always use them in a very careful thoughtful manner, as though your very existence depends on it!

Jamie McClanahan said...

2 words. GUERILLA MARKETING. Cheap, inexpensive MASS marketing techniques. USE JANGO. This is GREAT advertising because you only get charged for people HEARING YOUR MUSIC! If you're good, you'll get fans INSTANTLY. Go to shows and hand out free promo CDs with your single. Get blaster programs (myspace/facebook/twitter) to help automate your myspace work, so you can reply to EVERYONE who comments you. They'll feel appreciated and will spread the word. Word of mouth is the best advertising there is, and it's FREE!

Casey Dilworth said...

I would say that the best thing you can do is research everyone before you give them any money. I would make sure you can get along them, are on the same page as to what you expect from them, and what they should expect from you. And, be careful. The economy is slow right now, there are many out there scratching for a living, and they are looking for you. The old if it seems to good to true, it probably is.

Be careful, the best is to have someone you trust, to verify who you are doing business with, that will know there reputation.
Good Luck

James said...

I believe social networking sites are the key to emerging artists success. It's best to spend as much free time on these sites getting your music out there to people who have never heard of you before. It's also good to communicate via messages or comments to your fans to make them feel like they are involved in something cool like talking to your band.

Dave Whitton said...

Constant research in finding your niches is extremely important. Being very analytical and concentrating on who is enjoying your music and why. Jango, Reverbnation and your own website do a great job in finding who likes you and why. Don't be to involved with yourself when it comes to Twitter and Facebook, people on there will tune you out if your constantly shoving stuff down there throats, be conscience of what they're doing as well. All in all its a day in a day out process some of it will work and some of it won't, just keep rockin!

Bellegrace said...

Attention spans are very short these days. In whatever media you use, my advice is to always be begging the answer to a question. Short, catchy song titles that leave leave a void give cause for pause. Example: "Rooster Don't". I wrote it. You have no clue what the Hell I'm talking about. One second to read it. Five seconds to wonder about it. Maybe now you gotta know. Your new listeners are not going to give you more than that initially. Seize it!

Jami said...

Jango Airplay unlike anyother online music service can connect you directly to potential fans. The science is basic: Who do you like or think you sound most like? You get airplay, fans and exposure. It's always imporatnt to stay digitally connected using Facebook, Twitter, Myspace and iTunes but Jango Airplay is the only service that allows artists to select their audience. Add new songs, interact with your audience and peers. Grow your fan base and keep your profile fresh with bulletins and performance updates. Your music lives here; Jango is the perfect distance from the Sun.

Michael Rossey said...

Make sure what you are spending money on to promote yourself will give you a big bang for your buck!!! Think it out...

John Craig said...

You have to stay genuine to yourself and your craft. Giving up, not an option. You have to be patient. You have to have everything set up before you get 1000 fans, so preparation is key, and dont DIS anyone, as 1 fan really means 10 or 100 fans lost. They are your Gold, and if true they will follow you. Try to seperate your fans as a business base from your personal life issues, thats a hard one and make this mistake frequently. Lastly, you have to love what you do, everytime you lay your tiny hands on your keyboard, musical or computer. Good Luck!! John Craig

Thomas Dayton said...

I have my music streaming on SoundClick. I have a VIP account with them. That means I can take a widget of all my songs and drop it in my MySpace, FaceBook, and the like. Also I can access any song with a url and post it at any of the social media sites. I find in the course of being social something may be said that one of my songs speaks to. I make my comment and I link to my SoundClick player for that song. I gain another play on my SoundClick site which pushes me up the charts there. I get people hearing a tune and so they may check out others. I like my sites everywhere so if you go to one you can find a way to go to another. The bottom line is I think I offer something that is unique which is a key. It makes people interested even if they do not dig the stuff. Over all my music is poor musicianship and production, but I do find myself doing well in getting it out there!

Melissa Mars said...

Love your fans, show your support for your fans, listen to your fans and give your fans what they want. If you do this, your fans will never leave you. You will gain them one fan at a time, but over time, you will have an audience. That's what social networking is about...the fans.

P.E.A.R.L. said...

Digitally speaking...the sky is the limit! The best advice I can think of is offer more than music...offer yourself and connect with your fans. They can either make you or break you! Meet them where they are, even if it's first thing in the morning on their phones, while they're in class, or on the go at work. People are always checking MySpace, Facebook, Twitter etc. Be personable...for those of us who still have a small fan base, take advantage of it and be that artist/musician that thoughtfully replies to e-mails as often as possible, sends thank you's, blogs, uploads pictures off stage and out of the studio, or ultimately one who does a bit of their own social networking. Don't wait till your name is sparkling in lights to say "thank you" or even have a little fun. When they feel you value letting them into a bit of your life, they'll respect you, your lyrics, and your heart. Still, being digitally savvy does have a business side. A professional appearance (photos, media, marketing) with a personable appeal, managing online airplay, taking note of your fan index, money management or digital sales, for example, are all important, too. They will allow you to assess how well you're doing and if your fans are truly being reached which is very important. The digital world can also enable you to receive your money faster via direct deposit so you can stay in business and your fans will stay happy :)

jason kern said...

Aim for quality subscribers not quantity.

Initially NO said...

Remember to keep playing live gigs as well as offering samples of your music virtually on places like jango, broadjam, myspace,muziboo, youtube... And let your audience know where they see your show!

The Pine Needles said...

First, you need to really believe in the media that you are about to feature. It's time to separate demos (put these on your casuals only Electronic Press Kit) from CD quality recordings & videos. Remember that people are used to hearing expensive sounding recordings. Secondly, you need to be engaging, consistent, and inviting on all of your various web pages. There should be nice photos and graphics that have a theme that you think best matches your music and over all vibe. Thirdly, you need to be friendly and personal with the people who took the time to become your friend or fan if you expect to sell singles and other merchandise. Post when you have fresh news, which should naturally be often, as the music you promote should be your heart and soul.

Jennifer said...

With the digital age, emerging artists have ample opportunity to get their music heard with the internet. These days everyone is plugged in, exchanging information around the world at lightening speed. So how can your music get in on the action?

The best advice I can give to emerging artists is to tap into niche communities. Who is your audience and what is the best way to reach them? For instance, with Jango, I found that I'm most popular with females, ages 18-30. If I want to expand into this community further, I need to focus my energy on adding members of this group on twitter, myspace, etc...Why? Because there's a higher likelihood these people will be into my music.

Once you've identified a few niche communities to target, you should think of ways to get a dialogue going- spark some social media conversation! As an artist nowadays, the curtain is always up because your audience goes beyond the fans that come to your live shows. Every single person who sees your blog, your tweets, etc... is a potential fan. Get them interested!

-Jennifer Logue
www.myspace.com/jenniferlogue
www.jenniferloguemusic.com

Kristian Jackson said...

The greatest acts of all time have survived due to the relationship they have built, over time, with their fans. Nurtured appropriately a fanbase will evolve from simply being a network to a community. if you don't believe me, check out U2 next time they're playing in town, or a Michael Jackson (R.I.P) concert. They're probably the best examples on a large scale.

The digital age enables artists to connect with their fans and to nuture and maintain that community spirit across the entire world without having to do the hard, constant touring slog, and more importantly, without having to spend millions on marketing. However, artists need to keep one thing in mind. If you wish to develop the relationship with your community, apply all the same social rules and guidelines you would in the real world. Knock on people’s doors and introduce yourself. Be open and honest about your intentions. Dress simple but classy (how cluttered is your MySpace?). Once someone has become your friend, visit/contact them regularly but not constantly (ie. don’t spam them. Esp. on Twitter) otherwise you’ll outstay your welcome (like the record company who’s tweeted me 21 times in the past 9hrs). Give people the same respect in the virtual world as the real, and your community will build, and with that, your sales. People will buy all your material (including your shameful efforts) if they believe in and trust you.

At least that's my humble opinion. Good luck everyone.

K

Donnie Mayer said...

I would suggest that the band or artist open the following accounts: Reverbnation.com, Facebook and Myspace. Then as you learn how to utilize the "Control Room" at Reverbnation you can place TuneWidgets and the "My Band" application on your Facebook and MySpace profiles.
These will track and count your impressions, clicks, plays, of your songs and/or videos, Band Equity Status, Sales and most importantly fans. You may and should share these Widgets virally throughout the web also!

Glowing Black said...

Honestly. Promotion is your best option and when you are just starting to look to expand you are more likely to look at expanding over the internet by using free or inexpensive music distributing services. The more sites you're on, the more your music will expand. 99 hours of internet is annually consumed by all people ages 12 and older. This statistic should be taken advantage of. Use the internet to your full advantage in music expansion and always read the terms of the service to make sure that your music will be properly promoted. If anyone tells you that you should not promote yourself then they are trying to keep you out of the music industry because they see you as a potential threat to their success in the music industry.

Robert Nix said...

First of all YOU need to find the correct site(s)that will work for you,a site where people are there to listen to music and this site Jango along with YouTube are the two best in my opinion.
Don't waste your time with myspace and facebook,it's okay to have a presence there but keep in mind those sites are primarily for social networking.
Treat your fans like gold-everyone who becomes a fan of mine here at jango gets a friend request and then a comment from me.AtYouTube the same-I thank everyone who leaves a positive comment on both my page and video and as a result I have CD Sales going and bigtime sharing of my video.
I hope these tips will help you out.

macharo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
macharo said...

The best advice I can give new upcoming artist are these three things: promote, promote, did I mention promote yet?
Whem it comes to promoting yourself as a new artist, you want to make yourself as accessible to as many potential fans as possible. We all know it's impossible for us to be everywhere at once, and do everything we. That's the beauty of these new social networking sites and media online services.
They assist to bridge that gap, making us more accessible. It puts us in multiple locations at once and makes it easier to take advantage of more opportunites as indie artists.
For examplw I was tossing around the idea of starting up anartists profile on Jango Radio for a couple of weeks. My felloow indei artists AC Da Perfecto encouraged me to go ahead and sign up and get extar radio airplay. I had just decided the amount of spins that I was going to purchase. Two days prior to purchasing the spins I received an email from Ourstage.com. It was a reward of 100 free spins from Jango Radio. I finished in the top 100 of a contest on Ourstage.com and didn't even have to spend my money. I encourage all upcoming artists and indie artists to utilize these mediaservices. You don't know what you're missing out on if you don''t!!!

Http://www.myspace.com/macharo23

Terry Davis said...

Definitely get your music on reputable music websites that will help get your music out to those who would be interested. Stay in touch those who follow your music & keep them abreast of what you're doing. The avenues are out there, you just have to be a little selective as to whom you promote your music through.

TS Boss Records artist -"Miscelanyus" said...

Its real simple - If you dont have a band page on all the social networks, like facebook, twitter, as well as Jango than your are definantly wasting oportunity for exposure. Most Independent Artist can't afford the marketing exposure social networks gives you. This is the best thing that ever could have happen for Independent Artist. Finally we can fight back the major labels. With the exposure we get we can sell our own music and use that social network to let every body know where to buy our music. If you are leary of any social network that charges money - research that network "All the search engines are free". The internet is the most econimcal tool we have as Independent Artist. Some of those social networks are resposiable for a lot of artist getting discovered. As an Independent artist you must realized that its a new error in the music industry and social networks are a must. I hope everyone realizes that most of the A&R's at the major labels surf the social networks for talent. What I suggest to every new artist -Create as many band pages that you can on as many social networks as you can. Get your music played on every Internet radio station that will play it. You cant measur the value of the stat information Jango has available to there members. With all that said every Independent Artist needs to join as many social networks as posiable...

Sky Vega said...

Separate from the pack but focusing on visibility in a saturated market...Simple solutions like adding commonly searched tag words like "Hot" or "Sexy" to your uploads can help you pop to the top of search engines.

Also, social sites are about building relationships. Avoid spamming your fans, but rather connect with them in personalized emails and relatable tweets.

Loadedgunnzz said...

Keep your head high never look down. Remember. to be yourself and reach for your dreams. Put yourself out here on all the different sites. It only takes the right person to hear you. If you don't put your music out here no one will hear you. Myspace,unsigned,stereofame,beta etc.

Andre Herrera said...

The best advice i could give is that when ever people start out in music using these sites they will never right away get millions of fans or indeed "millions of dollars" so one shouldn't get discourage if their album sales and fans aren't as high as they'd in the first year or so, or it doesn't mean these sites aren't helpful. just keep on producing more music and putting it out there. hint: don't be afraid to invest(time, money) in yourself because you will get your rewards. It just takes time

Evangelist Cathy Guyton said...

My advice is to go ahead and do it. If the social sites are doing as they say they are and promoting your material, you really have nothing to lose,especially since your endeavor is to gain the exposure and get your material recognized. You can never sign up with too many promoters and your product never be heard by too many people. So,spreading yourself too thin is not the question but rather spreading yourself wide enough. Perhaps that right person will hear you at the right time.

CR said...

Do It! This industry is tough and any platform accessible to you, should be capitalised as much as possible. Speaking as an independent artist with no backing, it's better to have some affordable yet impactful form of exposure, as opposed to none whatsoever. To be featured alongside artists with truck loads of "backing", is humbling and inspiring.

CD Schwartz said...

You need people to “C” you so they’ll hear you right? So make what you post “Creative” and “Catchy”. Make your band’s name spread like a good virus, that once people see how you represent your band they’ll be inspired to listen.

Find what’s unique about your band and use a memorable catch phrase that sums it up. Or an irresistible offer that’ll make them click play on your music right away, like “Click play, a million bucks are on the way”, then have a picture pop up of a million male deer with antlers smiling! Using “Comedy” can help – everyone wants to smile!

You also need to use your “Community” of fans – give in”C”entives to your street team to spread the word and increase your exposure.

Then it’s up to your music - make sure it sounds at least as good as you advertised it! We all need “Constructive Criticism” to hone our art. Join services like Broadjam and Taxi, where the song critiques can help you improve to be your best, and the sites simultaneously increase networking, exposure and opportunities.

It’s “Cool to Care”. Make it something bigger than just you. We’re all on a very small planet that needs a lot of healing. Connect to our “Creator” and team up with a good “Cause” – represent them, perform at fundraisers, etc. I challenge all of you to write a socially conscious song to inspire a better world. We all have power to do something more with our music!

Fely said...

Fely here,

the best advise I can give to any emerging artist as myself is to take a full advantage of a social networking online radio site like Jango, I haven't seen anything like this compared to the other social networking services. Jango is accurate, reliable, very organized and help independent artists understand their market and the entire music business, which boosts their confidence. Your fans here are true to you because they chose your music and not forced onto them.

Oscar said...

Build for interaction:

Invite remix artists to download stems and submit their contributions. It's easy to arrange a remix competition on your website and advertise it on for example remixcomps.com.

It will get more eyes and ears on your music. You'll receive new ideas from the remixes, and the remix artists will probably want to share their remix with the rest of the world, so you'll have a few more promotors right there.

Be sure to include the remixes on your next release, your fans will appreciate it!

See our example: http://www.keylas.com

KEVIN DAVID & Friends said...

Unsigned musicians should be honest, genuine, and professional when trying to further their careers online. Remember, the public is "new" to unsigned artists. All songs should be "radio ready" before submitting, and appropriate images of the artist should be included also (people like to "see" what they're hearing). Think "pictures" and "magazines". Would your band or artist's "entertainer image" fit in with what you're used to seeing onstage nowadays? It should!

Young artists are preferred because youth affords more career longevity. Not always true, but those with lots of years "under their belts" might downplay the age factor when possible. Unknown and aging musicians don't attract record buying fans like younger artists do, so promotion should work accordingly. Age may have little to do with talent, but it can definitely affect an artists career. Over thirty and not quite a celebrity artist yet? FORGET about age! Whose business is it anyway?

Submitting to too many websites isn't wise, but the music should be heard so how many are considered okay? Moderation is key, don't overdo it. More online music sites exist than most realize and cause songs to be harder to locate. Competing links on musical pages can help, as does signing up with many guests, fans, and friends. Ask these folks to continue visiting your pages periodically and who knows, maybe you'll end up hearing your songs on JANGO! Once people can find your pages and enjoy your music, you'll start seing more people interested in your efforts.

Anonymous said...

Hi Miss Geo here,

I would say embrace your unique qualities and share them enthusiastically online! You have a niche audience that really wants to be a part of your musical journey. I've seen some pretty cool videos and giveaways. Personally, I like to build relationships with fans and see what they are passionate about. When they post things I'll check out their blogs, art, shops. If we share music in common we probably share alot of other things in common too. I've traded my CDs for some really cool crafts they made. I feel like I know them on more of a personal level!

Burzinski said...

1. Create your own website / blog and put all your music online (free download or stream, with tools such as bandcamp.com widget)
2. All social media you choose has to redirect to your website : this is your home, the place you own, with which you can do whatever you want
3. Contact as many gatekeepers as possible in your music genre (ie music blogs, ezines, online radios etc, online competition) : each time you're played is a big step ahead...
4. Never spam people, find ways to let them hear about you (like recommendation tools etc...), or tell a compelling story about you so they become curious about you.

connie lansberg said...

Give something instead of asking for money straight away.(That can come later) That's the best thing about online sevices. The hard sell just doesn't work. Reward people for discovering you by giving them a track for free. Answer every email and make it personal. Being able to connect as person rather than an artist trying to sell something appeals to people. They need to know how we are alike and how we're different. Both are interesting to others especially if thy already like what you do.

Shiva said...

1 Make fews things but goods.
if you are not famous It's unuseful make 20 songs that maybe sounds similar and share'em all in one week.
2 Don't stress people wit you music.
I mean it's ok send bulletins and let the people know about your stuff.
But there's a point where you have to stop and let the "fan" come to you and not always viceversa.
3 Don't loose too much time to make compliments to other artists just because they will do the same.
4 Don't be obsessed with bein' famous.
Just try to do good stuff in the best way you can.And then just share it with world.whaterever will be will be.

Damien Cripps Band on Jango said...

We quadrupled sales online in 6 months , How?
1.Establish a community of media Platforms to operate from - extends from what everyone else is saying(choose wisely you only have 24hrs in a day)
Our essentials are ;
a) Jango
b) Twitter
c) You Tube
d) Myspace
e) Reverbnation
f) Facebook
g) Last FM - you will need others as well.
2. Understand; even the Record companies didnt see overnight success in the old model, noone saw the lead up work to a release.
3.Choose a primary media outlet you centrally operate from (ours is twitter @damiencripps)
4. Cross pollinate between them via primary. This is hard listeners only really want one connection.
5.Build a close friendship with those that offer continued correspondence.Dont ask them to get too involved straight away, when you do ask offer them something first FREE
6. Nurture those who are committed they will grow your audience.
7.Learn & Understand the 5 steps to a true fan (Google it) now adapt.
8.Monitor everything
9.Spend on Jango & last FM its Cheap advertising.(Jango is cheaper, however LastFM automatically adds listeners , Jango lets the listeners choose)Both have pros and cons you should have both.
10. Sell your music vibe. = satisfied dedicated customers :)

Shortcuts To Fame said...

The best advice I can give is never be afraid of promoting your music and finding your target audience. Be prepared to get a negative reaction every now and then but don't let these people slow you down. When promoting your music you should approach it with the attitude that somewhere out there people NEED to hear your music and it will benefit them in a positive way. Search out lists of top music networking sites and sign up for as many as possible. This all creates links to your music and increases the odds your music will be heard and your name will appear in search engines, especially Google. When your recordings become a high enough quality move up to internet radio sites such as Jango and Last.fm. Be personable with your fans and create a connection; one loyal fan will generate more income for you than 1,000 fake friends on Myspace. Learn how to use Search Engine Optimization. This means incorporating your band/company name as much as possible without sounding redundant. Use sites such as myspace and reverbnation to create a mailing list early on, this will be important when all your fans are spread throughout many different sites. And finally, be creative, try things that have never been done before. Remember this is the entertainment industry and we are all here to entertain. Be Entertaining.

rricardouk said...

Times have changed. You are in control of your own creativity. From a garage you can be appreciated by billions. More than the money itself, is the recognition and feedback of your work. Listen to your instincts. For the first time you can have the tools to make a difference to other people life's, because music it's one of the most influential, life changing experience humans can have. Go for it. Change the world.

Lucie Eavns said...

Get email addresses and mobile numbers. EVERY mobile phone recives a text. If a fan won't give you contact inforamtion, they're not a fan. Collect email addresses at gigs with a pen and piece of paper - remember to write down where you are! Then you can email them when you play that town again. Give away free entry passes with an SMS text. Get creative!

The most important thing we've found on Jango is using the stats. Almost every aspect of the data we got was different from our assumptions. It's been invaluable in shaping our story and strategy.

Anonymous said...

Hi!

The Auto Dropouts - Sweden.
I would like to focus on the benefits coming from avoiding all the crappy postings of self importance & fake buzz going on out there. I feel that an upright approach with less focus on "shameless self promotion" tends to pay off best. Simply to be very honest and very you. More flyer postings everywhere might be a backlash & as i hate it myself i never do it. If you got great songs they will find theire way to peoples ears thank's to emself almost. Got to do some blogging to inform where you are about - but NOT about every little action you take. To ask your fans kindly with respect if they like to help you out is so much better than the "bombing" method. Trust me on this :-) - i would recomend any new band to put theire songs in the bin of "Garageband.com" to get a great number of reviews on each song. Then you get a various picture of what people hear in it - a good thing indeed. and it helps you to sort out and to leave out the material that dosen't get any good feedback. If you care for real about potential fans - better to stay in contact with the ones you have and to build slowly from there than to bomb the world. If you're good enough there's so many great promotion individuals out there helping you for free. It's all back to honesty again.
Thank's n cheers!
Petit gollum

Frozen Inertia Music said...

First: Record at home, it's cheaper, and spend the LEAST amount as possible on CDs, there is absolutely no reason to invest in this any more, since worldwide distribution is available on I-Tunes for $35 through CD Baby.

With that in mind think of the money saved as your budget for marketing: Use it 4 ways ---
1. Buy a URL, and create a landing page, so you're "official". Use this to link to other sites -- I-Tunes, Facebook page, etc
2. Use Jango Airplay to get the buzz going, and monitor who listens, who doesn't, and adjust accordingly
3. Create a press release using PR Web, to get exposure from press
4. Advertise on the big 3: MySpace, Facebook, and YouTube (if you've made a video)... over 400 million users on Facebook and Myspace, and YouTube is 40% of the online video space. It's fairly cheap on cost per click basis, and again, you can monitor and change things based on who and what is generating interest.

The Sons of Harmony said...

What it will all boil down to in the end is persistence and perservering. The race is not given to the swiftiest or the strongest( remeber the toirtuse and the hare)

But the race is won given to those who persevere when they are discouraged, tired and feel like giving up. The obstacles are there for reasons that you may not understand now, but only later.

We are not meant to conquer every mountain, but ourselves. Those mountains of fear,depression,doubt and the like will often give way to persistance and believing in yourself more than you doubt.

Just think of the people who sign up for American Idol who really have no chance...boy some of them have great perserverance and nerve and belief in thenselves. Who knows how close you are from being that next SUCCESS story.

Ben Calvert said...

Ben Calvert says: Sign up for every site that someone suggests to you. Make sure that these sites are in different territories, so you can cover the main markets of The US, Europe, Japan and Australia. Put a selection of different songs on each platform. So you might have your whole recent album on one site, your first album on another, and recent demos on another. Make sure you have links to where people can buy your recordings in physical and digital formats. (There is still a substantial market amongst the 30-60 age group who DO want a physical product in the form of a CD or vinyl record rather than a digital file, AND these are peope who are more used to paying for music!!). Have a look at each site three months later and see which ones are working for you. Delete the profiles on the sites that aren't working for you. Sign up for royalty collection societies so you can get royalties for plays, so you can get an income when people are just listening and not buying. And lastly-There is no substitute for playing live to gain a loyal fanbase. I've never sold acent of music as a result of Twitter...

Mike Kornrich said...

Forget the online stuff for now. Get out on the street and phone and promote. Work hard in this direction then try some online promotion.

Rebekah Ann Curtis said...

Target: Know exactly who you are and who your (potential) audience is.

Know what kind of music it is you create, know who you sound like, and then find people who will most likely like your music. There are tools on Jango, Myspace, Facebook, Twitter, iTunes, etc that will help you discover potential fans.
I like to use Jango to get my music to potential fans that are in a specific age range. It allows me to exclude people that will not be interested.
You have to know as an artist that you can't win them all. If you sound like Britney Spears or the Black Eyed Peas, you are not going to win over hard core Lacuna Coil fans and vice versa. Don't waste your precious energy and money targeting people who don't want to hear you. Be smart.
Connect and utilize every website you are on, post links to where you are at on every site you are on. Use Twitter to direct a new blog post on another site, a give-away, internet radio, your shows, etc... If you are doing things right, you'll have people signing up and finding you on every site. But it all starts with knowing who you are as an artist(s) and targeting to your potential audience.

Dennis Logan said...

First you must have a first class demo that sounds like it belongs on the radio. Don't fool yourself, the odds of making it are 10 mil to 1.Put you music on every site you can. Write a killer bio and add great pictures. Email everyone, I have 8,000 fans sold 30,000 cd's and just got picked up by a European PR Firm because they heard me on Jango! I keep working the internet everyday, one fan at a time, don't be lazy.

Ronda Matson said...

KNOW WHO YOU ARE!

“What kind of music do you play?” That’s the big question. Very often, it’s the first question. In the fast-paced Digital Age, the cyber scene, there is truly no time for a meaningful, in-depth explanation of musicians and their music. The megabyte has no attention span. Sad as it may seem, it is imperative to be able to attach words or a catch phrase (at most, a sentence) with the immediate ability to describe you and your sound. “Branding” is the new essential term to understand. Know who you are. Be able to communicate that clearly, uniquely and the sky just might be the limit.

Ronda Matson
http://www.rondamatson.com

WILLIAM R HART jr said...

The new age of music is here!!With all the bootlegging that is happening there is no choice but to market online, independent artist and labels now have a even playing field.With online marketing you are reaching the world in seconds,if you are a label you have a chance now to become a real power house in the music industry online...THIS IS THE FUTURE OF THE MUSIC BUSINESS !!Soon all will be able to have internet radio in the cars the way we listen to music is changing fast.You must be ahead of the game NOW!!

The Sense Of Amelia said...

Quality not quantity!
Don't worry about how many people are visiting your page or other bands and what chart position you are. Just find listeners who are on line. Ask nicely to come and hear your music. You don't know who it will be. Do try to find promoters agents and managers. We have a single release being used in a TV commercial to be broadcast throughout the US this coming January with a tour in the spring all because of being polite and courteous on Stereo Fame, oh yeah and cos we are actually good!

Cheers and the very best of luck!

k said...

Wow my own radio station that plays my music first, Who would of thought! I was fortuned enough to get requiered numberes listeners for general rotation,this occured when I had credits. During this time I aquired my fans and listeners, yes I have aquired some without credits, but few, what is great is you can buy and target your credits or plays, I have found using the jango geographical statistics, where most of my listeners are, and that is where I will target first! This blog is pretty cool
too, as I dont exactly have this down yet, but I believe in my music enough to take
me all the way. Kirk Kobos The Original Soloman 5000!

ksysenka said...

Believe in yourself and you will get everything!

Iain Hitt said...

There are two main components of social networking that you have to hit hard to get the best results, the first being that everything has to look completely professional. This includes page layouts and desgins, such as myspace, writings such as biography's and news posts,and everything in between. The bigger you appear, the bigger people will think you are. The bigger people think you are, the more interested they will be. This includes not just fans, but also labels, managers, booking agents, etc.. It may be expensive(especially on myspace) but it is crucial to your campaign.

Second of all it has to be friendly and inviting. You have to market yourselves to your followers as friends not fans. Your social networking site has to reflect this outlook, or you will turn away many potential followers. This has to do with bulletins, blogs, comments, messages, and page content. Your twitters, for example, need to reflect who you are as people, not as a band. Blink 182 s a perfect example of a band whose success started from making vulgar jokes on stage, and highly interacting with their fans. You do not need to be vulgar in any way, but you do need to emulate this idea onto your social networking sites.

Happy Campaigning

Iain Hitt

Katherine said...

A few words of advice for new bands and artists trying to boost their music career! All of these digital tools are amazing to get yourself out there as long as you care for them as if they are your family! One of the most important things to do is keep up with your fans! These are the people who will make you a success so send out thank yous and support those who support you! In my experience, the most loyal fans have been those that I communicate with on a personal level! Certainly, it is a lot of work, but they appreciate hearing from those who they support! You not only make yourself known by promoting your page, but you also make yourself even more memorable! So, when you're outside of the cyber world, you'll have people that are there for your music and for YOU! Best of luck to all in this crazy and exciting ride as a musician!

-K.T. Mudd
http://www.jango.com/music/K+T+Mudd

Farmer Brown said...

Simple, make it apart of your everyday life. Using these tools to promote your music much like using your fingers, plate, fork and spoon to eat they deliver food to your mouth, these are the means of transport. You are selling your brand make your music apart of your culture, style, your swagger and way of life. You are the true independent artist.

Farmer Brown

dano mick said...

I think a great way to succeed and market yourself is to find a demand for it. If your a band, think of a way to make yourself connect to a special niche, or create your own. We make our own animated series at myspace.com/posenude. It's something we'd do anyway, but it seems like people really connect when they have a story context to what your doing. Our cartoon series is funny, and it puts everything in context, while forcing us to have a down to earth outlook as we laugh at ourselves. (myspace.com/posenude

sugar ray coney said...

jango.com is one or is the best online service in this digital age of getting your music heard,around the world.my music has been heard around the world.and anyone that want to listen to my music,they just go to Jango.com.the sound is also good.Jango is very fair with the artist in helping the artist emerging to sucess of getting their music listen too by millions.Thank to jango.com my music is a sucees.and I also let the children listen to my music that is in the hospital,these children love jango.com.and with jango.com,my song-Say No To Drugs-Stop The Voilence has touch many hearts and lives.I have also put Jango.com with my music on Facebook and Twitter,Jango will make your Star shine,Sugar Ray coney

Chris Moore said...

The first step one should take is to find a reputable A&R group. The inside information is priceless. Tunecore is a magnificant hub and offers quick access to the industries icons. Music is in a transition period similar to the LP to Cassette to CD technologies developements, so remember that much of todays methodologies are unfolding. Adapt and overcome. The marketing tools provided by Jango feedback are what I've found to be the most effective in targeting distribution. Fan Overlap, Age/Gender, and the Geographical Mapping of listeners provide the most valueable information for understanding how the market will respond to your music. No other site I've found offers these tools. As you watch the geographical maps "green in", it is astounding to see how quickly we can spread throughout the world as blooming musicians. In just under one month Jango has played my tunes in almost 50 countries, and 49 states, including Napal, that's the top of the world isn't it? Don't release until you have tested the market, and be decisive in your targeting. Be your own biggest critic and let me quote Sting here, "if you get a bad review today, you should be over it by lunch tomorrow"

Sean Delaney said...

Well the simple fact is, the era of having talent and receiving a record deal is pretty much over. It really depends on how much hard work your willing to put into it. That will really determine how much you are going to get out of it in the end. I say use the "web" just like a "web". Network the social sites to establish a reputable name for yourself and gain exposure by reaching out to connections you can utilize. With these new contacts you should be able to create a fan base and a visible biography people could see who normally wouldn't be able to. Through Facebook, Jango, Twitter and Tunecore you should be able to tune the world into who you are as a person and an artist. Give them all the necessary information about why you do what you do, and let them into your world by providing a passionate and sincere repertoire! Then, be sure to use the resources on a daily basis so the traffic grows and your confidence will grow right along with it. In today's digital era, all this and more is imperative in establishing yourself as an artist. Good Luck!!!

Sufia Giza said...

Social media has been an invaluable tool in terms of getting my music out to a larger public, including globally into places I couldn't even imagine. First myspace and facebook started the buzz, then jango airplay allowed me to actually gain fans and see how they responded to certain tracks by staggering the play. For an Indie artist who doesn't have a budget for a publicist jango airplay let me reach listeners across the planet, whom I never would have targeted. For example, we were excited when we saw someone in Haarlem respond and thought he had a listener in New York City, but when looking closer, it was Haarlem with 2 aa's, as in the Netherlands. How cool is that?

Chattrisse said...

I wouldn't tell anyone which social networking services to use, or how many accounts to have, but I do know that YOU, the artist, need to be responsible for the content on any online account that is, after all, an extension of you. I write (type) every word that is read on my MySpace, YouTube, SonicBids, Facebook, ReverbNation and Jango pages, and whenever possible, I approve others' comments before they're posted -- not only is it important for you to control your own image and affiliations, but the fans can definitely tell when they're being spoken to by someone whose music they like, as opposed to being spammed by a robot or a secretary. This will take a little time (a lot when you get successful), but it can be done!

Breck Stewart said...

I would suggest to any band trying to get exposure for their music to really go for it and submit the material to as many outlets as possible. You should give away a few songs for free and have a precise image and concept for each, scrutinizing the statistics and keeping your profile up to date. The thing is that one never knows which online service might work for them. There are many web sites now and the number is growing daily. I personally found out that some are born and die rather quickly but the ones that survive can become a potentially rewarding way to get the music heard. And the fact is that a web site might work extremely well for a particular band but not so much for another for some obscure reason. One might be tempted to only submit their material to a few chosen sites among the most popular ones of higher quality. That is certainly an acceptable strategy but what if a particular web site with lower traffic and less stellar design actually gives an artist a nice play rate? Whose to say which site will work for you? I never stopped myself from submitting my songs to a web site just because it wasn't one of the most popular around. And I never regretted that decision as it still pays off to this day.

Bob Lavalley said...

My advice is to be true to yourself and be random. I have used most of the well known sites with little success until I came to Jango. I have let Jango place my songs all over the world and have amassed many fans from many places. If the songs are good you will get fans and I have personally responded to every one of them and thanked them for their support. They are the folks you write music for and they need to know how important they are and how much you appreciate them. Your fans are the bottom line and only Jango can reach them. Bob Lavalley

Gidgets Ga Ga said...

The best advice for an emerging artist is to write, record, master and perform the best music they can before hitting the internet circuit. The internet has made it easy to upload music. Discovering great music is much more difficult due to the volume of music online. Let your music be your best advertisement.

Become a member of a professional songwriters/publishing organization such as ASCAP or BMI. Own the rights to your songs, publishing and master recordings. You'll be able to license your music and earn income that way.

Social networking is never ending, time consuming and tricky but ultimately, very rewarding. We have become a member of nearly all the social networks and have learned to turn our focus to the top three - Facebook, Myspace and Twitter. All are unique and necessary. Maintaining an online presence is essential. Content drives the net, so get cracking on CD reviews, gig reviews, music blogs, etc. Work the big three daily for a minimum of 15 minutes by making friends, emailing fans, promoting a show, etc. Delegate each band member a social network. Once you get around on the net, don't be surprised when social networks come to you. The most important aspect of social networking and working an online presence with the web is to get your band on every site possible. You never know who is going to stumble upon you from one of those sites. Remember that the music comes first and the marketing is second.

Anonymous said...

Keep on plugging away .... Persistence,my friends I am so glad I found Jango. I have heard so many other Fresh sounds, None of it was on the Radio. Sure I surround my playlist with my favorites from terrestrial Radio but the Make or Break feature is Fantastic. Jango asks for a little money up front for the chance of an audience... You're worth it !
Add the links to your other networking pages.
Variety is a Tasty spice of Life if I say your tune is tasty it's Tasty... carry on

twnfinity2 said...

Keep on plugging away .... Persistence,my friends I am so glad I found Jango. I have heard so many other Fresh sounds, None of it was on the Radio. Sure I surround my playlist with my favorites from terrestrial Radio but the Make or Break feature is Fantastic. Jango asks for a little money up front for the chance of an audience... You're worth it !
Add the links to your other networking pages.
Variety is a Tasty spice of Life if I say your tune is tasty it's Tasty... carry on

Anonymous said...

There's some advices i can give to pull up your music promotion in this digital age :
- work on your profile before posting images and sounds. Give the rights informations about you... don't say too much, but enough to push listeners to go toward you and your music,
- To be there for answers and up to dates is important : the more things happens, the more interest you give to the listeners,
- Give a lot of informations about your music style and influences, so the listeners should know what they can expect if they listen or buy your music...
- Give a big work on your sounds and songs... There's should be logical and technical points that must be coherent : the level of all the songs must be the same, the mix must be clear, and the effects you use in your music should give a "face" of your music to put put you in a style and near of some artists that listeners use to appreciate...

Good luck !

DJ Def1le said...

This is DJ Def1le and my advice to those of you in Music Groups or even making or creating music independently is that you shouldn't be afraid to put some of your music out there regardless of your thought or feelings, as long as you get your name out into the Industry and once that happens you'll get a listening ear and Fans for Feedback. Just Put it out.

Continuous said...

They say that the music industry has changed, but who are they, we are the ones now days producing music right on our computers, and the consumers buy it right on their computers also, so it only makes sense to promote it right from you computers directly to other people on their computers. I myself praise the convenience of online music services and social media groups, making it a whole lot easier and inexpensive to reach out to your future fans compared to 20 years ago. I say take advantage of the this digital music revolution because soon major labels will flood online music services and social media groups with million dollar budgets making your online presence and availability minuscule in comparison to them. Jango is a new form of sharing our media in the midst of established billboard artist, this can become one of the biggest opportunities to gather fans independently in any artist career. So go online sign up to everything and promote yourself, the more your available online the easier your fans can find you, and the further that your audience can span.

Linda Basso said...

In the digital age, you need all the press/blog promotion you can get. Jango is a great place to test run your music, get fans, and fan comments, target your audience and interact with them. I read somewhere that there are 4000 music releases a week !!! If you are to stand out, you need to spread the word in a viral manner. Jango allowed spreading this worldwide reaching fans in all corners of the world for me.
Thank you for this great service
Linda Basso

Singing Bear said...

Keep Performing. Reach out to the people around you with flesh and bone because there's nothing like music being created in the moment. I have luckily been able to learn the tricks of internet marketing and have listed my music on almost 20 social networks and now, I have to say, it only feels like a huge distraction. If you are putting out good live music, then keep putting out good live music as often as you can. Other people will find you and follow you. You don't have to hunt people down and convince them to follow you. Social networking is for making friends, not fans. Never look for fans - they will find you.

Jennie said...

Online music services and social media are a great way to create awareness for your music, build your fan base and show potential label or distribution partners statistics that could be used to indicate presale numbers for your music. Social Media connects you with real people who love and consume music. Word of mouth and viral marketing are leading methods for marketing new artists by major labels. Posting your music on indie band sites or using online music services can build a buzz, if you start charting or wining contests. Seeking out internationally based sites provides an opportunity to test your music in foreign markets and get attention for your music, you might not get using more saturated sites like Myspace. Some great international sites are (Australia) http://www.whotune, (Japan), http://www.youmusic.jp, (England/UK), http://www.overplay.co.uk.

Twitter is among the newest tools a musician can use to promote their music. Through my own use of Twitter, I secured internet radio show spots, had a song of mine used by a horse racing podcast, landed an ongoing guest spot on a UK college radio program, found new fans for my music, one of whom now records a weekly podcast for my music, landed a spot on internet TV show called TwitterLive and built a growing fan base who is waiting to purchase my debut album, which is due in January 2010. The key is to interact daily using this media and you will be blow away by the results when you do.

Anna Epelbaum said...

I can advice to use computers and digital devices, as much as possible. I-myself to achieve on this way a lot. Enter my name-Anna epelbaum into www.amazon.com or www.lulu.com and see for yourselves. I need currently a couple of high quality male voices, like tenor and baritone, or tenor and bass. I have the entire opera to record with my lyrics and the divertisment of Russian music. If interested, get back to me over author0072002@yahoo.com.
I didn't work much yet on dissemination and popularization of my music, as I was too busy with creation, but check out my results on U-tube, etc.

Judith Snow said...

The best piece of advice that I can give to emerging bands such as myself in the digital age that are using social networking sites to further their careers is to make sure that you are extremely careful with what you say or do online when using your real identity. In this age, I recommend three computers per person. One for your music career. One for your personal career. One for your Job career. Need I say more about having at least three identities? When you make it big, you just don't want things coming back to bite you in the bum...So, be smart about what you say and do and realize that this is a business and this is work, so no matter what site you choose to hang out on, its important that you promote yourself everyday and realize that talent isn't good enough, its going to take a lot of money and a lot of hours to get results.
-Judith M. Snow

Minna Colada/Hotgothic said...

Don't just make fans, make friends. Treat people who you meet through your Band as equals, not as admirers: remember faces and names.
Get one person from your band to deal with ALL Internet networking, and make sure they not only update all the relevant information regularly but also ANSWER comments and messages sent to the band. Developing an authentic relationship with people who like what you do will help you go far!!

Rich and Rome said...

The Best Advice I can give is this: BE OPEN. Be open to the idea of what these social media sites can do for your MUSIC career - whether that's increasing sales of your songs, gaining new fans, getting fans out to your gig, or simply getting your music heard by one new person! Remember that careers aren't built overnight - you are building your career one step at a time - one brick at a time - kind of like a house -so make sure it's built on a solid foundation - and when you look back 6 months, 1 year, or 3 years from now - you'll be mighty glad that you built your career house on a solid foundation!

http://www.youtube.com/richandrome
http://www.jango.com/rich+and+rome
http://www.myspace.com/richardsmithbeverly

PANTA said...

1-Be honest and don't try to be someone else.
2-Work hard, very hard. Music is a business like any other. When you're not playing, get on the web and connect with the planet.
3-Value your work always! pay attention to details.
4-Get people to be your partner. Social networks are exactly that: SOCIAL NETWORKS
The best thing is that you can make a lot of new friends using these virtual networks. But never ever forget that you're dealing with a human being everytime you publish your music.They might love your songs, but they might not.

I hope I helped
http://www.pantaoficial.com.br

Whitedog said...

In this day and age i'd say an online, networking presence is as important as the strings on your guitar. Since the beginning of the, "naughties," record labels, and especially the Majors, have been reducing the amount of funds they are willing to spend on Artist 'development.' In the last three years they have been taking a backseat to watch what happens, as online promotional tools and networks become more and more advanced and accesible. You can now go straight to your audience without need for a middleman. The UK based 'Artic Monkeys' and Australian 'the Chloe Hall Trio' are both fantastic examples of what can be achieved with a determined online stratery.
As for Jango, there is no better resource for getting your music to a global audience than Jango.com's online radio broadcasting. I have been uploading and playing tracks for less than six months and now have fans in Cuba, Romania and several states across America. It really is fantastic. Whitedog

geminezy said...

Make sure you have a high quality solid product to market on any social site. That is the key to gain a real following. Participate in as many contest that you can on any network, bottom line is that most contest are judged by fans so that will give you the oppurtunity to gain new ones. Have a solid bio & pic to display on your site, people like to know who you are. Keep your name flowing every where on the net, word of mouth goes a long way. Respect and appreciate if some fans don't like your product, it helps you to grow as an artist & allows you to create better music. Bottom line enjoy sharing your creative vision with others on any network & before you know it you will be the talk of the town, have fun!!! Geminezy-Wealthguru.

Henry Donahue said...

Not only do i chat with my fans,but i also
upload my You Tube videos and jango airplay
link on all my other website links.
They are:
Twitter,FaceBook,My Space,Windows Live just to
name a few and i have been successful at
doing this.

hank donahue

Foley Road said...

As a band, we want everybody to have the chance to listen to what we offer. Our music and our interpretation of the pieces we play belong to everybody and we want to touch their souls. Foley Road has a unique soul and we know that our fans and listeners reconnect with the songs we share. It is our soul to theirs and social networking helps make this possible. It is grassroots and if we ever achieve anything it will be because of the people who gave us a a chance, our fans and listeners.

MICCHECK the Italian Connection said...

Dont give up. Dont be discouraged if you think its not working. The possibilities are endless, but keep in mind its like a needle in a haystack. There are so many artists involved with so many different sites that you may feel it is hard to stand out on these sites, however persistence and innovation will help you make a name for yourself. That means keep updating, keep blogging, and keep putting your music infront of new people. Dont become annoying and seem like a spammer, but when you have something new share it with the ones that have taken interest in your music and the new people that havent heard it. So really there are 3 main tools. 1. Re-invent yourself to stand out. 2. Be persistent. Update and keep it interesting 3. Pick and choose your battles. Dont overwhelm people and dont keep posting to people who have no interest. Hope this was helpful. Thank you. Piazon.com Check me out and all my links. Peace

Roel van Veldt said...

I believe there's a lazy way to market your music online. It might take longer (not necessarily). Anyway, time is a friend.

My secrets:
1) One hour a week will do, but be consistent.

2) First create a personal website (a pro link like www.artist.com that forwards to a free wordpress blog will do). Have a short bio with a few funny anecdotes on the left, a streaming/selling widget on the right, and a blog (about what you'd love to hear from your idols, but always clearly related to your music and to one other passion).

3) Then start on Jango with 4 songs and 1000 credits. Match your music as good as possible with the most popular artists in your style. If you, like me, have different styles, promote them apart until you've got at least 20 fans or free airplay. Make your music fit in well between professionally mixed and mastered music (test offline and remaster if needed). Use the stats to adjust your positioning.
Do this, and you will get those fans before the 1000 credits are used. Remember: in this beautiful world, there will always be enough people to love your music. Just find them, or better: let them discover you.

4) Now the magic trick: befriend with fans (don't wait) as you would do offline, e.g. at first 2 times a week, then weekly, then every 3, 4 weaks might do. Remember: too much love with kill either you, or your fan. :-) Real friends don't need daily, and certainly not hourly updates.
Make time for your friends 1 to 3 times a week. Thank them for every contribution and reward them with free exclusive downloads, artwork, free tickets, free t-shirts... Always invest accordingly, and if they stop investing, just keep them on your mailing list (only drop a fan at their own request).
And then... ask on your blog what you need, who you need (street team, web designer, online marketeer...). And then your friends will ask what they can do, how they can get a cd, or whatever.

The Lazy Way: relate, take time to befriend, ask... and you shall be given.

Why Lazy Marketing? Because the rest of your time you want to make great music being your brilliant self. Shine! :-D

The King said...

First of all your attitude should be one of meeting people,making friends and giving information or service.Selling should come after cultivating friendship,respect,honesty and a genuine concern for each other.If one has a cause this is good because you won't have to try to be genuine.Also you can connect with others on a deeper level.Perhaps they will purchase your products or services simply because they have grown to like you and what you are about. Character cannot be faked for long and conviction moves many a sideliner.I don't push anything on anyone and I am always concerned with the larger picture.Sales are a by product of toil,time,talent and the convictions of your truth.People know when they are being "sold" something and most don't appreciate it.I believe that if they like your music...they will purchase it.Sell(for free) your passion...the one that you know you will never make money at.Every now and then mention your music and try to do it in a way that is not like a saleman.Treat them as you would like someone you are a fan of to treat you.Treat people as you would like to be treated.Transfer your enthusiasm in a gentle and thoughtful way.Then they will buy your music and spread the word..

itsmarketingmadness said...

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS FIRST. This is the best advice I can share. Get to know people by by reviewing every profile before you befriend them. Respond, without begging a total stranger to buy your product. Use some of the information they have shared on their page in your response. Then, have conversations. LISTEN to what your "friends" are saying and respond accordingly. People are bombarded with information and ads all day long. It is refreshing when someone takes the time to listen and notice you. Networking and marketing are about building relationships. As people get to know you they will learn what you do and when they want music or refer music, because they feel they know you, you will come to mind before a stranger. People buy from those or what they feel is familiar. So, take advantage of social media's ability to allow you to easily check out a person first. This is the way to get true fans who will buy and refer. Remember, quality over quantity. What good is thousands of "friends" who don't buy?

Next, 1) your profile's about me section - use it. Your 1st paragraph states your style/approach, any recordings, and an overview performance statement. 2) your email signature should include your facebook, twitter, myspace, and website/epk with a lead capture, viral music and video widgets how to purchase your work. Also, use it when posting comments.

mealdates said...

I post stuff to websites like:
Youtube
Facebook
www.mealdates.co.uk
Hubspace.com

davidbaer said...

Influence can be defined as the power exerted over the minds and behavior of others. A power that can affect, persuade and cause changes to someone or something. In order to influence people, you first need to discover what is already influencing them. What makes them tick? What do they care about? We need some leverage to work with when we’re trying to change how people think and behave.

www.onlineuniversalwork.com

Abass said...

Affiliate Marketing is a performance based sales technique used by companies to expand their reach into the internet at low costs. This commission based program allows affiliate marketers to place ads on their websites or other advertising efforts such as email distribution in exchange for payment of a small commission when a sale results.

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henrylow said...

Affiliate Marketing is a performance based sales technique used by companies to expand their reach into the internet at low costs. This commission based program allows affiliate marketers to place ads on their websites or other advertising efforts such as email distribution in exchange for payment of a small commission when a sale results.


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Coetsee said...

Affiliate Marketing is a performance based sales technique used by companies to expand their reach into the internet at low costs. This commission based program allows affiliate marketers to place ads on their websites or other advertising efforts such as email distribution in exchange for payment of a small commission when a sale results.
www.onlineuniversalwork.com

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edward said...

i engage my social media by offering them great content, i am in the freebie business and we have to compete by being the fastest to find freebies. Gratisfaction UK is one of the faster growing socia media platforms out there and i appreciate the user base by doing competitions which help with engagement.